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Shop quickly to score the hottest deals from Costco.ca, where you can save on clearance products from Apple, LG and more.

For the uninitiated, products with prices ending in .97 typically indicate that the item is on clearance and will be discontinued soon – you'll find .97 clearance products scattered throughout every Costco warehouse (items may vary by store), while online products are listed in Costco's Going, Going, Gone section.

There are over 120 clearance products available online and we've listed a handful of the best deals below.

These Costco clearance deals are available online while supplies last. A Costco membership is required to shop online and shipping fees are included with all online items.


Posted August 3: Get Kirkland Signature Embroidered Sweatshirts and Joggers in Canada

Start the fit check with a trip to Costco, where Kirkland Signature Embroidered Sweatshirts and Logo Joggers are now available in Canada.

NOTE: Kirkland Signature Logo Joggers are new to Canada and not (yet) available online, but they have been spotted at a few Canadian Costco locations.

Originally released in 2020, the Kirkland Signature Embroidered Sweatshirt features a Kirkland Signature logo across the chest, with red embroidery used for the Signature wording. The sweater exploded in popularity in 2021 on social media due to its high quality, in-warehouse scarcity and exclusivity – as one glowing review notes, "it drips street cred...plus it's more exclusive than Yeezy or Supreme" (seriously).

Kirkland Signature Logo Joggers were released in late-2021 and received equal amounts of hype online – the joggers were initially only available in the United States and this is the first time they've been spotted in Canadian warehouses. The joggers are made of the same material as the sweatshirt, with a small screen-printed Kirkland Signature logo on the left pant leg.

Kirkland Signature merch is available online and in Costco warehouse locations while supplies last. A Costco membership is required to shop online and shipping fees are included with all online items.

Showing 40 Most Recent Comments

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    • This looks like really good value based on the specs. If you are a casual home cook, meaning you don’t cook that often or you are just getting started, I wouldn’t hesitate buying this set at this price.

      If you are more serious about cooking, looking to invest in a set of knives that will last a lifetime and you can afford to spend more, this is probably not for you.
    • Report Post
    • Stock update:

      117 left of the black
      2 left of the white
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    • This set is good jesus. This will be more than enough for the average home chef. If youre thinking of pulling the trigger on this go for it. Don't let the snobs tell you otherwise.
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    • Stock update:

      177 left for the black
      44 left for the white
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    • i do need some better steak knives, but this is lacking a cleaver, shame
    • Report Post
    • Marketing gimmick. People fall for the German steel thinking it’s made in Germany… not that made in China means it’s worse, but people are more likely to buy it if they see Germany on the product description
      Plus, some Chinese steel is actually very good nowadays, possibly better than some German steel in terms of edge retention etc. It's inaccurate to generalize that all Chinese steel is crappy. Spyderco makes high end folding knives and they have produced in China for 15 years for their lower priced line.
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    • I'm curious what percentage of "German steel" is actually needed to label something as having German steel.

      Unless "German steel" isn't even made in Germany? That's even worse.
      German steel simply means that it's made with the German formula.

      These knives are made in Yangjiang, Guangdong. The city has hundreds (perhaps thousands) of business that focus on making knives, scissors and pocket knives. Most of China's knife production comes from this small area, simply because they have the steel, machinery and cheap labour.
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    • While I've already stated my opinion on their comparison in the OP, I'll further emphasize why the Cangshan set is better than the Henckels International set you linked to at Canadian Tire.

      The advantage of the Henckels set is that you get two extra knives: a bread knife and a bagel (serrated utility) knife. The block has three spare slots for future expansion.

      The advantages of the Cangshan set are:
      • knife block is made from wood (acacia) versus some "charcoal-coloured" synthetic material (more pleasant and will wick away any accidental moisture left on a knife; still, there are better ways to store knives than a block)
      • bolsters are angled back allowing for better/easier pinch grip and less intrusion of bolster when sharpening the blades
      • handles have a rivet for aesthetics and practicality to fasten to the tang of the blade (the Cangshan knives are full tang while the Henckels might not be, which would be a deal breaker right there)
      • no blades are serrated, meaning that you can sharpen all the knives (serrated blades are a cheap cop-out as they rely on tearing rather than cutting)
      • the 5" Santoku knife here is much more useful than the 6" utility knife in the Henckels set
      • shears are detachable (for sharpening and cleaning) and are amazing quality (see @cncpun's review above); the Henckels ones are absolute garbage
      • and last but far from least, higher quality steel hardening leading to better edge retention in the Cangshan set.
      There is no comparison, IMO.

      Also, Costco is a better vendor than Canadian Tire. And the set is $10 less expensive.

      P.S. Sorry to rain on your purchase, but the single-man Henckels International knives are exactly what give "made in China" knives a bad reputation (and likely why this Cangshan post has 8 down votes).
      Wow, thanks. Not raining on my purchase at all - I haven't opened the set yet, so I'm glad I saw this before doing so. If they're shitty quality, I want to know. Reviews are pretty good on the CT site, but sounds like you're a knife guy/gal and your breakdown is very helpful!
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    • How do these knifes compare to the Henkels knives that are on sale ($99 from $400) at CT that I picked up?

      https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/henc ... ml?loc=plp

      This CT set does not seem to be sold elsewhere, but has pretty good reviews on the CT website.
      While I've already stated my opinion on their comparison in the OP, I'll further emphasize why the Cangshan set is better than the Henckels International set you linked to at Canadian Tire.

      The advantage of the Henckels set is that you get two extra knives: a bread knife and a bagel (serrated utility) knife. The block has three spare slots for future expansion.

      The advantages of the Cangshan set are:
      • knife block is made from wood (acacia) versus some "charcoal-coloured" synthetic material (more pleasant and will wick away any accidental moisture left on a knife; still, there are better ways to store knives than a block)
      • bolsters are angled back allowing for better/easier pinch grip and less intrusion of bolster when sharpening the blades
      • handles have a rivet for aesthetics and practicality to fasten to the tang of the blade (the Cangshan knives are full tang while the Henckels might not be, which would be a deal breaker right there)
      • no blades are serrated, meaning that you can sharpen all the knives (serrated blades are a cheap cop-out as they rely on tearing rather than cutting)
      • the 5" Santoku knife here is much more useful than the 6" utility knife in the Henckels set
      • shears are detachable (for sharpening and cleaning) and are amazing quality (see @cncpun's review above); the Henckels ones are absolute garbage
      • and last but far from least, higher quality steel hardening leading to better edge retention in the Cangshan set.
      There is no comparison, IMO.

      Also, Costco is a better vendor than Canadian Tire. And the set is $10 less expensive.

      P.S. Sorry to rain on your purchase, but the single-man Henckels International knives are exactly what give "made in China" knives a bad reputation (and likely why this Cangshan post has 8 down votes).
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    • Be careful, they are very sharp, today it cut wife’s finger.
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    • original price is 169.99. not sure if it's worth it. but this price is pretty sexy.

      anyone ever owned this or Cangshan brand can comment on the quality of the product?
      I have a set of these knives. They are very very basic set of knives. $90 seems fair but the original MSRP is 100% rip off. If you don't need 12 knives , I recommend spend the money buy 1 good knives + a whetstone instead of this set.
      I also have a WÜSTHOF, which feels very different compare to this Cangshan when I am sharpening it. Moreover, Cangshan feels more flimsy compare to the Wusthof. However, if you don't compare, it does work great. Oh, the plastic handles easily get all scratch and looks faded easily. Get the wood or stainless steel handle if you care about the look of the knives. Lastly, don't be fool by the GERMAN STEEL sale marketing pitch, except those Dollarama garbage grade products, Most normal knives are German Steel, it's so common like made in USA strawberry, LOL.
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    • Okay last update here. I just used the kitchen sheers to cut up and remove the back of a whole chicken and they work wonders. Better than my Napoleon BBQ sheers Ive been using for years.
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    • Update: arrived today. Visually more impressive than I thought it would be. Of note the scissors seem to be of great quality, are very rugged, and will be good kitchen sheers to cut chicken etc. they also come apart easily for cleaning between the blades. I am almost more impressed with the scissors than the knives.
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    • Ah, either you're trolling or let's just say, amiss.
      Haha thanks for the info above. I’m not trolling actually… I just figure if these last a couple of years with some sharpening and scrubbing rust with a bit of steel wool when it pops up that’d be fine at this price point.
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    • Ordered. I need a dishwasher set for everyday use so I hope this fits the bill.
      Ah, either you're trolling or let's just say, amiss.
      Notes:
      - these are sharpened at 16°, i.e. Asian-style (and yes, a 15° sharpener will work fine)
      - 6 steak knives are straight blades, i.e. not serrated
      - hand-washing (as with all quality knives) recommended
      - HRC of 58 +/- 2 (hints at possible lower quality control or purposely changing the hardness per knife based on application, e.g. Santoku knife might be made softer than the chef's knife as it may more likely be used for chopping)
      - NSF certified
      Cromova 18 steel also contains more Carbon and Chromium, combining to be a bit more corrosion resistant than X50CrMoV15 steel. I still wouldn't recommend putting them in the dishwasher though.
      While X50CrMoV15 steel is rated as stainless steel, it is not all that "stainless" compared to some other steels. It is good enough to get through kitchen tasks and sitting out in humid environments. Dishwashers, however, are known to damage knives if they knock them about or have harsh detergents. Cangshan's FAQ: https://cangshancutlery.com/pages/faq
      Are Cangshan knives dishwasher safe?

      Never wash your knife in a dishwasher. They get banged around which can cause damage. Also, you do not want your knife in hot water and steam for a long period of time as the heat could damage the knife's heat treatment and adversely affect the knife's performance and edge retention. The extended exposure to the liquid may also cause rusting.
      I wouldn't want you to be this guy:
      2022-09-06 00_20_16-Cangshan L_L1 Series German Steel Forged Knife Set, 12-piece _ Costco - Opera.png
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    • I'm curious what percentage of "German steel" is actually needed to label something as having German steel.

      Unless "German steel" isn't even made in Germany? That's even worse.
      AIRCRAFT GRADE ALUMINUM
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    • Ordered. I need a dishwasher set for everyday use so I hope this fits the bill.
    • Report Post
    • The set is impressive for the money. Price is more fair. Thanks
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    • Just wanted to say that is an amazing answer and I fully agree with every word. I would not spend a ton of money on a knife unless you really know what you want.[
    • Report Post
    • Thanks for the detailed post. You seem well educated in this space.

      If you were given a choice - would you buy the global 2 piece set (chef + pairing knife) at Costco for $79.99 or a single Victorinox chef knife?

      Also, what are your thoughts on a Takamura R2/SG2? I saw this Japanese knife but it's over $300 CAD.
      Google is our friend ;)

      For fear of derailing this thread and hopefully not insulting you, I'll keep this short. The choice of selecting individual knives is much different than settling on a set. And the rule of thumb is to buy knives as you need them. I'd go one step further and say that for most people they should buy the cheapest decent quality knife they can find and get familiar with what they like and don't like about it and proceed from there. Knives, for the most part, come down to personal preference (how much each weighs, how it balances, feel of the handle, ...). From a utilitarian point of view, keeping the knife sharp is more important than how much one spends on this or that.

      The more you spend on a knife, the more you'll want to invest in keeping it in top shape. That means using a honing steel before every use. Then perhaps even using a diamond steel from time to time. And then depending on your investment or the complexity of the knife's blade angle, further investing in at least two whetstones. For example, spending $300 on a knife would imply that you'd aim to hand it down in the family and thus would never subject it to a pull-through sharpener (that would take too much steel off). But skipping all the aforementioned steps can be forgone in favour of simply using a pull-through on a cheaper knife whenever it gets a bit dull.

      I'd recommend going to Ikea or a commercial kitchen supplier and try and hold as many knives as possible. Then buy something simple like this $23 chef's knife and figure out if you prefer using a pinch hold or hand hold on the knife over time. You'll also get an idea of whether 8" is the right size or whether you'd like to go to 10" (or a smaller Santoku knife).

      I won't go into the specifics of the knives you've mentioned. I personally don't like Global knives and find the G2 hard to pinch hold. Pairing knives are dirt cheap. Victorinox has over a dozen different chef's knives. I would suggest you could further solicit help on your particular topic in the Home & Garden discussion forum.
    • Report Post
    • Global knives, like the Cangshan ones, are also Asian-styled knives with a sharp-angled blade usually between 10-15°. Note that Asian-style knives are thinner and thus usually lighter than European-style knives (e.g. Zwilling, Wüstoff, Victorinox, ...), which typically have blades set to 20-22°. There are pros and cons, or at least personal preferences, to these attributes.

      Global knives are made from a proprietary steel called Cromova 18. It's mineral composition and characteristics are outlined here: https://knifebasics.com/detailed-cromov ... el-review/

      In summary, Cromova 18 steel is typically harder than X50CrMoV15 steel: 58 HRC compared to likely 56 HRC in real terms for those in this Cangshan set. This means that it'll retain its edge/sharpness longer, but will also mean that it'll be less easy to sharpen. The softer X50CrMoV15 steel will be more resilient to chipping (say if you hit a bone) and will withstand drops on the floor better.

      Cromova 18 steel also contains more Carbon and Chromium, combining to be a bit more corrosion resistant than X50CrMoV15 steel. I still wouldn't recommend putting them in the dishwasher though.

      Overall, Cromova 18 steel was made to be more consumer friendly than other traditional Japanese steels like VG10 - so I'd say it sits between X50CrMoV15 and VG10 in both price, hardness, and easy of use. You'll find Global knives often more than twice the cost than Cangshan knives. If you know you want very steep angled blades (for fileting a lot of fish for example) or you border on prosumer volumes of work and need a blade to stay sharper longer and willing to take the trade-offs, then Global knives will suite you better.

      Global knives are also made in Japan (rather than China) meaning that they are likely made to higher quality standards. The Japanese take their knife-making very seriously.

      Global knives usually have all metal handles (that I find cold and less attractive, but obviously a personal preference). The stylistic handles in the Cangshan set could potentially fade / change colour and/or crack if they happened to be from a bad batch. The nice thing about buying them from Costco, though, is that if that turns out to be the case, you'd have grounds for returning them.
      Thanks for the detailed post. You seem well educated in this space.

      If you were given a choice - would you buy the global 2 piece set (chef + pairing knife) at Costco for $79.99 or a single Victorinox chef knife?

      Also, what are your thoughts on a Takamura R2/SG2? I saw this Japanese knife but it's over $300 CAD.
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    • Upvoted for the detailed explanation
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    • Global knives, like the Cangshan ones, are also Asian-styled knives with a sharp-angled blade usually between 10-15°. Note that Asian-style knives are thinner and thus usually lighter than European-style knives (e.g. Zwilling, Wüstoff, Victorinox, ...), which typically have blades set to 20-22°.
      A lot of the German knife makers have gone to 14-15 degree angles for many of their knives for a while now.
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    • How does this compare to Global Knives?
      Global knives, like the Cangshan ones, are also Asian-styled knives with a sharp-angled blade usually between 10-15°. Note that Asian-style knives are thinner and thus usually lighter than European-style knives (e.g. Zwilling, Wüstoff, Victorinox, ...), which typically have blades set to 20-22°. There are pros and cons, or at least personal preferences, to these attributes.

      Global knives are made from a proprietary steel called Cromova 18. It's mineral composition and characteristics are outlined here: https://knifebasics.com/detailed-cromov ... el-review/

      In summary, Cromova 18 steel is typically harder than X50CrMoV15 steel: 58 HRC compared to likely 56 HRC in real terms for those in this Cangshan set. This means that it'll retain its edge/sharpness longer, but will also mean that it'll be less easy to sharpen. The softer X50CrMoV15 steel will be more resilient to chipping (say if you hit a bone) and will withstand drops on the floor better.

      Cromova 18 steel also contains more Carbon and Chromium, combining to be a bit more corrosion resistant than X50CrMoV15 steel. I still wouldn't recommend putting them in the dishwasher though.

      Overall, Cromova 18 steel was made to be more consumer friendly than other traditional Japanese steels like VG10 - so I'd say it sits between X50CrMoV15 and VG10 in both price, hardness, and easy of use. You'll find Global knives often more than twice the cost than Cangshan knives. If you know you want very steep angled blades (for fileting a lot of fish for example) or you border on prosumer volumes of work and need a blade to stay sharper longer and willing to take the trade-offs, then Global knives will suite you better.

      Global knives are also made in Japan (rather than China) meaning that they are likely made to higher quality standards. The Japanese take their knife-making very seriously.

      Global knives usually have all metal handles (that I find cold and less attractive, but obviously a personal preference). The stylistic handles in the Cangshan set could potentially fade / change colour and/or crack if they happened to be from a bad batch. The nice thing about buying them from Costco, though, is that if that turns out to be the case, you'd have grounds for returning them.
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    • How does this compare to Global Knives?
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    • I'm curious what percentage of "German steel" is actually needed to label something as having German steel.

      Unless "German steel" isn't even made in Germany? That's even worse.
      German steel - when speaking of knives - if often a colloquial name for X50CrMoV15 steel, which is originally made in Germany and is used in this knife set. Another type could be MA5 steel.

      Steel is made in a foundry with different percentages of iron ore and other minerals. In the case of X50CrMoV15 steel, this breakdown is described in this article: https://knifebasics.com/x50crmov15-steel-guide/

      Another useful summary guide is this post: https://cangshancutlery.com/pages/types-of-steels

      Essentially, the percentages of various minerals makes up the formula for various steels that then exhibit predictable characteristics of hardness, strength, corrosion resistance, heat resistance, etc. It's quite possible that the steel used in these knives was made in China to the German X50CrMoV15 specifications. But it should perform to those standards and expectations of wear and reliability.

      The differences in final hardness is actually in the heat and/or ice treatment of the steel. And these are company-specific secrets. It's just that one could reasonably expect a certain range of hardness achieved with different steels.

      As you go up in hardness, you can also expect certain tradeoffs such as brittleness (ease of chipping) and less ease of sharpening.

      Among other X50CrMoV15 knives, will this set be as good as Günter Wilhelm (also made in China) knives? Unlikely. But generally Cangshan are regarded better than Henckels International knives (made by the German company Zwilling in China, also from X50CrMoV15 steel).
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    • Two days ago Costco online dropped the price of that set to $29.97 and was promptly sold out of around 300 remain stock. You could try and get a price match, but in my experience it only works if there is stock remaining.
      Oh no! I didn't even see that post. Too bad it's sold out :( I overpaid! It's all good, can't go wrong for $50 for 6 pieces of decent knives.
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    • Was $29.99 in store or online? Darn it, I bought the 6 piece set for $49.99 online! If it's online, I'm hoping to get the price adjusted. I recieved my 6 piece set, and I was just planning on using it for the cottage. Don't really care for it, just need a sharp cheap knife to have around. It's not bad for the price you're paying for. The handle is nicely weighted. I'm usually a zwilling double man henckels fan, but for the price of one knife, I can get 6 pieces. So not bad.
      In store....
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    • Was $29.99 in store or online? Darn it, I bought the 6 piece set for $49.99 online! If it's online, I'm hoping to get the price adjusted. I recieved my 6 piece set, and I was just planning on using it for the cottage. Don't really care for it, just need a sharp cheap knife to have around. It's not bad for the price you're paying for. The handle is nicely weighted. I'm usually a zwilling double man henckels fan, but for the price of one knife, I can get 6 pieces. So not bad.
      Two days ago Costco online dropped the price of that set to $29.97 and was promptly sold out of around 300 remain stock. You could try and get a price match, but in my experience it only works if there is stock remaining.
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    • Hummm, just bought the 1537235 CANGSHAN KNIFE SET 6 PIECES for $29.99 last night at Costco and it doesn't fit in my old knife block so started looking for another knife block.
      Saw it last night on the website and it was alot more.
      I already opened them, sharp! Works great but now I need a new block....
      Decisions.
      This one doesn't have the bread knife or smaller serated.
      Was $29.99 in store or online? Darn it, I bought the 6 piece set for $49.99 online! If it's online, I'm hoping to get the price adjusted. I recieved my 6 piece set, and I was just planning on using it for the cottage. Don't really care for it, just need a sharp cheap knife to have around. It's not bad for the price you're paying for. The handle is nicely weighted. I'm usually a zwilling double man henckels fan, but for the price of one knife, I can get 6 pieces. So not bad.
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    • I'm curious what percentage of "German steel" is actually needed to label something as having German steel.

      Unless "German steel" isn't even made in Germany? That's even worse.
    • Report Post
    • Good deal got one. Looks nice as well.
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    • Not bad. I would wait until $69.97 or below.
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    • Thx OP ordered one in black.
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    • i need a set with something like this, which i almost always use it for everything...

      Image
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    • Thanked OP! Ordered the set in white.
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    • For a few weeks now, it's been 99.97$ in store. Anyone know if price dropped lower, in store?

      I bought a set, and it's the sharpest knife set I ever used. even the steak knives are amazing.. but yea, I'm guessing they will need to be sharpened often. The white set looks really good 👍
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    • Anyone know of a good SET for Fillet knives that have both short and long ones?
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